Straight Shooter

You mean I actually get to ride and shoot? I'd just arrived at world-champion mounted-shooter Annie Bianco-Ellett's Palm Ranch, Cave Creek Arizona, for an interview for the September 2005 WH feature "Safe Shooting." Greeting me in the driveway, Bianco-Ellett, a lively horsewoman with contagious enthusiasm, immediately swept me to the arena and invited me to a private lesson.

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Forward Cue

Midwestern Trainer and clinician Terry Myers recommends teaching your horse to follow a rope before teaching him to stand tied. The lessons will help him move forward toward the object to which he's tied. However, if your horse has spooked during past tying sessions, he might have extra fear associated with tying. If groundwork and tying to inner tubes and highlines isn't helping your horse, the following exercise might give him extra cues to help him to move forward and stand still.

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Trouble in Paradise

A horse and rider team is like a marriage. Some days, it's pure bliss. Other times, you might want to lace up the gloves and duke it out. But, before you and your horse head to the boxing ring, or file for divorce, check out what California trainer Jet Thompson says about the how's and why's of horse-rider conflicts.

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A Simple Collection Drill

The November '05 issue of WH featured four of trainer Andy Moorman's favorite drills for improving a horse's collection. Here's another collection-enhancing exercise used by the Venice, Florida, horsewoman.

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Inner-Tube Tie

In the December 2005 issue of Western Horseman, champion trainer and clinician Terry Myers, Ostrander, Ohio, shares his groundwork exercises and safety strategies to teach your horse how to stand still - and not pull back. He recommends teaching your horse to tie using a large, truck-style inner tube tied to a secure, deep-set post along a smooth, flat wall. Teaching your horse to tie with the inner tube helps your horse know to move forward. The inner tube will give, then pull your horse back into position faster than your own hands can correct and reward. Your horse won't feel the constant resistance of the rope; instead, he'll feel pressure, then release when he moves forward and stops pulling back.

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